Monthly Archives: August 2010

REBOUNDING IS FUN (AND GOOD FOR YOU TOO!!)

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weight, Rebecca Lazar - REBOUNDING IS FUN (AND GOOD FOR YOU TOO!!)I’m not too sure why rebounding, otherwise known as bouncing on a mini-trampoline, hasn’t caught on in the fitness clubs around here. If you ask me, every fitness facility should have rebounding classes, or at the very least a couple of rebounders for personal training sessions, because I’m sure that once people tried it, they would love it. Whenever I get a client on my Rebounder, the first thing they say is “This is fun!” and isn’t that what exercising should be all about?

Aside from fun and the obvious aerobic factor of rebounding, if you google “the benefits of rebounding” you will come up with so many lists of health, fitness, and emotional benefits you will think you just stumbled upon a miracle cure for everything that ails you. Alas, it’s not a miracle, (I’m a realist, remember?) but it is a fantastic way for you and your kids – one at a time, please! winking – to exercise aerobically without all the impact of jumping on the floor or running. It also works your core like crazy, increases the strength of all your cells, improves balance and actually increases the capacity of your lymphatic system in eliminating toxins. I dare you to find another mode of exercise that can do all that, especially without putting major strain on your joints. Even with an injury it’s fairly safe to use the rebounder, although I wouldn’t suggest any high jumping with joint or back injuries, just the basic “health bounce” as it is called (always consult with your Doctor before beginning any exercise program if you aren’t sure.)

Not all rebounders are created equal and if you plan on buying the cheap versions – anything under $250 Canadian – don’t bother wasting your money because I can tell you the thing will break faster than you can say “Rebound”. I personally own the ReboundAir pictured and I love it (www.reboundair.ca). It’s an excellent peice of equipment, plus it has a lifetime guarantee, which is awesome. I highly recommend it, although to be honest I have not tried the Urban Rebounder or the Needak Rebounder, which are supposed to be very good as well. JB Berns (www.jbberns.com), the man behind the Urban Rebounder, also created several rebounding fitness DVD’s for home use that are pretty good.

So take another look at this somewhat under-appreciated mode of exercise, you’ll be glad you did. happy

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WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A HOMEOPATH AND A NATUROPATH?

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As I promised on an earlier post, here is an explanation of the difference between a Homeopathic Doctor (Homeopath) and a Naturopathic Doctor (Naturopath). I am neither of these, by the way, so why am I writing this? Well, because I sometimes prescribe Homeopathic remedies, and because I am a practitioner who recommends natural foods and supplements, people assume I am one or the other (or both — now that’s impressive. Perhaps I should just nod and smile tongue ). Anyhow, here goes:

Homeopath

A Homeopath is someone who has a degree in Homeopathy. Homeopathy is a form of medicine that dates back to 200 years ago when Dr. Samuel Hahnemann discovered that if ingesting or coming in contact with a particular substance, say a plant, caused certain symtpoms in a person, if he gave that person that very same plant but in tiny diluted doses, it would trigger the body’s natural system of healing and those symtoms would disappear. This is based on the principle of “Like cures like.” For example, if someone got poison ivy, they’d be given a diluted dose (sometimes in thousand or even million dilutions) of poison ivy and those symptoms would go away. This is an over-simplification; in reality, if 2 people got the same diagnosis but exhibited different physical and/or emotional symptoms, they would be prescribed different remedies, one that matched most appropriately to the person, rather than to the diagnosis. Scientifically it can’t be explained exactly how homeopathy works, but we know that is does work. Frankly, although I am a person who can’t stand hokey, wacky treatments masquerading as medicine, I can assure you that homeopathy does not fall into that category. When you see it work, as I have seen, even in my own children – on fevers, insect bites, insomnia, even stuttering, trust me you’ll become a beleiver too. Now, I’m not saying it’s a cure-all, especially since there are literally hundreds of remedies and sometimes finding the most appropriate one is very difficult. There are also many illnesses that I don’t beleive Homeopathy can cure, and it certainly can’t help a person’s poor nutritional habits. That being said, it would still work to releive some of the symptoms, assuming you had the help of an experienced practitioner. Homeopathy can be safely used alongside conventional medicines and will not interfere with the action of medicines prescribed by your doctor. Because homeopathic medicines are non-toxic, there are no side effects and they are safe even for pregnant women and infants.

True proponents of Homeopathy believe in using one remedy at a time, and if the symptom picture changes or that remedy doesn’t work, they move on to the next. There are several companies, however, that make combination remedies for the average layperson to use based on the specific problem. If you go to a health food store, you’ll find many formulas for different ailments – if you’ve ever used Camilia for your baby’s teething pain, you’ve used a combination homeopathic remedy. As well, practitioners like myself will sometimes prescribe specialty combination homeopathic remedies to releive symptoms and speed up the healing process, without having to try several remedies to see which one works.

Naturopath

A lot easier to explain, Naturopaths are doctors of naturopathic medicine. They attend a 4 year medical school for alternative medicine and learn a variety of different ways to diagnose and treat medical problems, all using natural methods such as diet, ayurvedic medicine (a system of medicine originating in India), botanical medicine, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, naturopathic manipulation and traditional Chinese medicine, which includes Chinese herbs and acupuncture. Think of them as the “Jack of all trades” of alternative medicine. The benefit to this is they know a variety of ways to treat a person and can also perform diagnostic tests that require drawing blood; the disadvantage is it can sometimes be very confusing when you are prescribed many different modalities of treatment.

So, as you see, there is some overlap in both fields, as well as my field of Holistic Nutrition, but next time you enter in a conversation about natural medicine and some of the different types of practitioners, you’ll feel incredibly smart and knowledgable. smug

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